Skin Cancer Awareness Month

The sun is beautiful but it can also cause skin cancer.
The sun is beautiful but it can also cause skin cancer. Source: Sebastian Voortman

Let’s talk about something that affects everyone but is hardly discussed — Skin Cancer. One of the most diagnosed cancers, skin cancer is non-discriminative. It doesn’t matter your age, race or location if you expose yourself to UV rays you have a chance of getting skin cancer. Don’t take our word for it, the Skin Cancer Foundation has all of the facts to back us up, check out their website if you want specifics.

Now that you heard the bad news, let’s talk about the good news. Skin cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer. With a few precautions, you can significantly decrease your chance of getting skin cancer.

Prevention is Key

Apply a sunscreen with an SPF 15 or higher everyday!
Apply a sunscreen with an SPF 15 or higher everyday! Source: Pixabay.com

While it’s pretty hard to avoid the sun (especially if you live in the sunshine state), there are a few steps you can take to reduce your risk of exposure to harmful UV sun rays.

  • Always wear a broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF 15 or higher. If you’re outdoors for an extended period of time, research suggests you wear a broad spectrum SPF 30 or higher that is water-resistant.
  • Apply your sunscreen correctly. You need at least 1 ounce of sunscreen for your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. We suggest creams because sprays can apply unevenly.
  • Don’t forget to reapply. Every two hours or immediately after getting wet you must put on more sunscreen.
  • When outside, seek the shade especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. This is when the sun can do the most damage to your skin.
  • Don’t forget your lips, ears, and hands. These areas are exposed to the sun too and should get proper sunscreen coverage.
  • Examine your body head-to-toe at least once a month and get checked out by your doctor every year.

If You Can Spot It, You Can Stop It

Examine your body, head-to-toe every month
Examine your body, head-to-toe every month Designed by Freepik

The only way to 100% guarantee you do not get skin cancer is to lock yourself in a windowless room and never come out. Sometimes, even when you go above and beyond with prevention techniques, you still get skin cancer. The key to a successful treatment is early detection.

The best way to identify possible cancer is to look for it. By that, we mean practicing monthly head-to-toe self-exams. The Skin Cancer Foundation has a wealth of information on self-exams like warning signs of skin cancer, what to look for and even a step by step self-exam. If detected early, almost all skin cancer is curable.

If you’re more of a visual or auditory learner, we’ve got you covered. At Key West Aloe, we believe this topic is so important that we wanted to make sure everyone knows how to prevent and detect skin cancer.

Here’s a great video that explains everything in this blog post.

Here is a print-friendly infographic you can download and share with your friends, family and office.

Get SunSmart with Key West Aloe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Together, we can help spread awareness and help save lives.

How are you going to show support for Skin Cancer Awareness Month? Let us know in the comments below or join the conversation on Facebook and Instagram. Don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletter for more skin care tips & tricks.

KWA Team Signature
KWA Team

 

 

 

 

You May Also Like…

25 Replies to “Skin Cancer Awareness Month”

  1. I always say prevention is key too. Always keep sunblock on your, even if it is just a little tube. Anytime your out in the sun for a period of time, just put a little on. It really does help.

  2. Sun protection is a must my grandmother had skin cancer 3 times on her face. I have several autoimmune diseases and the sun is a no no for me so lots and lots of sun screen for me is a must and I always put it on my grandchildren.

  3. Be mindful of the time of the day you are out. I do not let the kids swim from noon to 3. Sunscreen…apply and reapply especially if in water. And stay hydrated.

  4. beacuse i am cancer scurvier i have now what it happen when i had to have surgery on the back for it i get it at least once year and i wear sunblock all the time

  5. I cannot express enough how critical it is for everyone to wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 and also make sure it is within the expiration date and apply often! Also get your skin checked regularly by a dermatologist once a year or whenever you see any sign of irregular moles or spots. My Dad died of Melanoma a few years ago after finally getting a mile in his back checked after ignoring it for so long. We never knew he had it since we never really ever looked at his back. It turned out to be advanced Melanoma and had to undergo surgeries on all his lymph nodes. They thought they got it all but after a year it returned full blown in his liver and stomach, growing very rapidly! He died two months later. We are still so very devastated but now try to spread the word about how important it is to avoid the sun as much as possible and when you do go in the sun wear the proper sunscreen and also get regular skin checks!

  6. I use the Key West Aloe SPF 30 and it is absolutely amazing. I have had melanoma so I try to keep some block and covered. I’m a sun baby so it’s super hard to stay out of the sun for me. I also use two Key West Aloe after Sun products.

  7. I definitely support Skin Cancer Awareness Month. I keep sunblock all over the house and in cars and purses so we never forget it.

  8. You should always use sunscreen and a nice hat that covers your neck/ears is great. I love key west aloe to help sooth skin before and after being in the sun. I first tried Key West Aloe when we stayed at Sunset Key two years ago. Now I would love to get some more because I am almost out and summer is right around the corner. This stuff really makes a difference if you already got a bit too much sun.

  9. I should start worrying about my skins, too, although I always thought I have strong Asian skin, darker and little oily that protects from the sun. But I noticed my skins are getting dryer and older than I feel.

  10. It is very important to pay attention to the warning signs. I appreciate the very informative article.

  11. We always wear 30 sunscreen!! And we are at we have to wear bug spray as well! I always look for clothing that has the sun block in it too. Thank you for all the helpful tips.

  12. Protection with a high quality sunblock, re-application at regular intervals and a hat are a must. Skin cancer is no fun!

  13. My sun tip is to always wear sunscreen and protective clothing when out in the sun. A wide brimmed hat is a must have! Perform self checks for spots and moles that look like might be cancer and have the doctor look at those spots. My mom worked as a lifeguard and had several skin cancer spots removed from her face and back. It can happen to anyone so we all need to be aware, protect ourselves and spread the word to family and friends. Thank you for helping to bring about more awareness about skin cancer!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *